21 September
2011

Quote of the day (Montreal graphs):

To compare the performance of exploration and validation, both algorithms were tested on a variety of random graphs. The first set of parameterized random graphs was generated by starting with a complete 2D lattice (i.e. a grid) and deleting a specified fraction of randomly selected edges such that the graph remains connected. This first family of graphs should be familiar to those who have been forced to drive a car in Montreal (where roads are often under repair in the summer), and are termed Montreal graphs with deletion factor p, or Montreal(p), p ∈ (0,1).

-- from a paper in 1997. I think maybe the term was first used in 1994.

These can also be described as geometric graphs generated by the Erdős-Rényi process,
constrained and to the 4-connected lattice and with a side condition to
maintain connectivity.

I put this first on my Google Plus stream, so I guess this counts as a cross-post.



A montreal graph

with a large number of deletions (large p).


By Gregory Dudek at | Read (1) or Leave a comment |    
Comments
Re: Montreal graphs

I just saw this post while trying to find reference for "Montreal Graphs". Thanks, for sharing!

Posted by: Malika Meghjani at February 12,2012 01:51
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